Adrenaline

Generic Name:epinephrine injection (EP i NEF rin)
Brand Name:Adrenalin, Auvi-Q, Epinephrinesnap-EMS, Epinephrinesnap-V, EpiPen 2-Pak, EpiPen JR 2-Pak, EPIsnap, Symjepi

Adrenaline Athletics strives to create a welcoming environment for parents, under the current health orders, parents and other visitors will not be permitted beyond the Check-In Station for any reason. The 2020-2021 Season is upon us. CLICK HERE - THE ADRENALINE STORE IS OPEN. Deadline is Friday January 29th, 2021 @11:59pm EST. Concerns about COVID-19, please refer to our parent site (ovr.org) Health News. Feb 11, 2019 Adrenalin ® (epinephrine injection, USP) is a clear, colorless, sterile solution containing 1 mg/mL (1:1000) epinephrine, packaged as 1 mL of solution in a single-use clear glass vial or 30 mL of solution in a multiple-dose amber glass vial. Indications and Usage for Adrenalin Injection Anaphylaxis. Emergency treatment of allergic reactions (Type I), including anaphylaxis, which may result from insect stings or bites, foods, drugs, sera, diagnostic testing substances and other allergens, as well as idiopathic anaphylaxis or exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

What is Adrenalin?

Adrenalin is used to treat severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) to insect stings or bites, foods, drugs, and other allergens.

Epinephrine auto-injectors may be kept on hand for self-injection by a person with a history of severe allergic reaction.

Epinephrine is also used to treat exercise-induced anaphylaxis, or to treat low blood pressure that is caused by septic shock.

Adrenalin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Adrenaline Shoc

Important Information

Seek emergency medical attention after any use of epinephrine to treat a severe allergic reaction. After the injection you will need to receive further treatment and observation.

Before taking this medicine

Before using epinephrine, tell your doctor if any past use of Adrenalin caused an allergic reaction to get worse.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • heart disease or high blood pressure;

  • asthma;

  • Parkinson's disease;

  • depression or mental illness;

  • a thyroid disorder; or

  • diabetes.

Having an allergic reaction while pregnant or nursing could harm both mother and baby. You may need to use epinephrine during pregnancy or while you are breast-feeding. Seek emergency medical attention right away after using the injection.

In an emergency, you may not be able to tell caregivers if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Make sure any doctor caring for your pregnancy or your baby knows you received this medicine.

How should I use Adrenalin?

Epinephrine is injected into the skin or muscle of your outer thigh. In an emergency, this injection can be given through your clothing.

Epinephrine is sometimes given as an infusion into a vein. A healthcare provider will give you this type of injection.

Read and carefully follow any Instructions for Use provided with your medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you do not understand these instructions.

The auto-injector device is a disposable single-use system. Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Do not give this medicine to a child without medical advice.

Do not remove the safety cap until you are ready to use the auto-injector. Never put your fingers over the injector tip after the safety cap has been removed.

To use an epinephrine auto-injector:

  • Form a fist around the auto-injector with the tip pointing down. Pull off the safety cap.

  • Place the tip against the fleshy portion of the outer thigh. You may give the injection directly through clothing. Hold the leg firmly when giving this injection to a child or infant.

  • Push the auto-injector firmly against the thigh to release the needle that injects the dose of epinephrine. Hold the auto-injector in place for 10 seconds after activation.

  • Remove the auto-injector from the thigh and massage the area gently. Carefully re-insert the used device needle-first into the carrying tube. Re-cap the tube and take it with you to the emergency room so that anyone who treats you will know how much epinephrine you have received.

  • Use an auto-injector only one time. Do not try to reinsert an auto-injector a second time if the needle has come out of your skin before the full 10 seconds. If the needle is bent from the first use, it may cause serious injury to your skin.

Seek emergency medical attention after any use of epinephrine. The effects of epinephrine may wear off after 10 or 20 minutes. You will need to receive further treatment and observation.

Also seek emergency medical attention if you accidentally inject yourself while giving epinephrine to another person.

Your medicine may also come with a 'trainer pen.' The trainer pen contains no medicine and no needle. It is only for non-emergency use to practice giving yourself an Adrenalin.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Do not refrigerate or freeze this medication, and do not store it in a car.

Do not use Adrenalin if it has changed colors or has particles in it, or if the expiration date on the label has passed. Call your pharmacist for a new prescription.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since epinephrine is used when needed, it does not have a daily dosing schedule.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Symptoms of an epinephrine overdose may include numbness or weakness, severe headache, blurred vision, pounding in your neck or ears, sweating, chills, chest pain, fast or slow heartbeats, severe shortness of breath, or cough with foamy mucus.

What should I avoid while using Adrenalin?

Do not inject epinephrine into a vein or into the muscles of your buttocks, or it may not work as well. Inject it only into the fleshy outer portion of the thigh.

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Accidentally injecting epinephrine into your hands or feet may result in a loss of blood flow to those areas, and resulting numbness.

Adrenalin side effects

Before using epinephrine, tell your doctor if any past use of Adrenalin caused an allergic reaction to get worse.

Call your doctor at once if you notice pain, swelling, warmth, redness, or other signs of infection around the area where you gave an injection.

Common side effects may include:

  • breathing problems;

  • fast or pounding heartbeats;

  • pale skin, sweating;

  • nausea and vomiting;

  • dizziness;

  • weakness or tremors;

  • throbbing headache; or

  • feeling nervous, anxious, or fearful.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Adrenalin?

Other drugs may affect epinephrine, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Frequently asked questions

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Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2021 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 13.01.

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Alternative names for adrenaline

Epinephrine

What is adrenaline?

Image of an eye showing a dilated or enlarged pupil - one of the effects of adrenaline released during a 'fight or flight' response.

Adrenaline and noradrenline are two separate but related hormones and neurotransmitters. They are produced in the centre (medulla) of the adrenal glands and in some neurons of the central nervous system. They are released into the bloodstream and serve as chemical mediators, and also convey the nerve impulses to various organs. Adrenaline has many different actions depending on the type of cells it is acting upon. However, the overall effect of adrenaline is to prepare the body for the ‘fight or flight’ response in times of stress, i.e. for vigorous and/or sudden action. Key actions of adrenaline include increasing the heart rate, increasing blood pressure, expanding the air passages of the lungs, enlarging the pupil in the eye (see photo), redistributing blood to the muscles and altering the body’s metabolism, so as to maximise blood glucose levels (primarily for the brain). A closely related hormone, noradrenaline, is released mainly from the nerve endings of the sympathetic nervous system (as well as in relatively small amounts from the adrenal medulla). There is a continuous low level of activity of the sympathetic nervous system resulting in release of noradrenaline into the circulation, but adrenaline release is only increased at times of acute stress.

How is adrenaline controlled?

Adrenaline is released mainly through the activation of nerves connected to the adrenal glands, which trigger the secretion of adrenaline and thus increase the levels of adrenaline in the blood. This process happens relatively quickly, within 2 to 3 minutes of the stressful event being encountered. When the stressful situation ends, the nerve impulses to the adrenal glands are lowered, meaning that the adrenal glands stop producing adrenaline.

Stress also stimulates the release of adrenocorticotropic hormone from the pituitary gland, which promotes the production of the steroid hormone cortisol from the cortex of the adrenal glands. This steroid hormone is more important in altering the body’s metabolism (i.e. raising plasma glucose) under conditions of longer-term, ongoing (chronic), rather than acute, stress.

Adrenaline Bikes

What happens if I have too much adrenaline?

Adrenaline Monkey

Overproduction of adrenaline is very common. Most people are exposed to stressful situations on occasion and so most of us are familiar with the typical symptoms of adrenaline release, such as: rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, anxiety, weight loss, excessive sweating and palpitations. However, this is a normal response of the body which is intended to help us respond to a stressful situation; once the acute stress is over, the symptoms quickly disappear as adrenaline hyper-secretion stops. Some people with obesity and untreated obstructive sleep apnea may be exposed to high levels of noradrenaline/adrenaline each night as they struggle to breathe; this might play a role in the development of high blood pressure in such people.

Very rarely, overproduction of adrenaline/noradrenaline may be caused by an adrenal tumour called pheochromocytoma or a paraganglioma (if it is located outside the adrenal but along the nerves of sympathetic nervous system that run through the chest and abdomen). Such tumours may run in families as well. The symptoms can include the typical symptoms of adrenaline excess on an intermittent basis but, in some cases, the symptoms can be quite mild so as to be barely noticeable.

What happens if I have too little adrenaline?

Suffering from too little adrenaline is very unusual, even if you have lost both adrenal glands through disease or surgery. Since 90% of the body’s noradrenaline comes from the nervous system, the loss of 10% via the adrenal glands is not really significant. 'Adrenaline deficiency' therefore does not really show up as a medical disorder except perhaps in exceedingly rare and unusual genetic catecholamine enzyme deficiencies.

Last reviewed: Jan 2018