Most Dangerous Game Unitms. Schrader's Teaching Portfolio

November 11, 2013

The most dangerous game map the setting is extremely important in the most dangerous game using clues from the story draw a representational map of ship trap island. The most dangerous game by richard connell off there to the right somewhere is a large island said whitney its rather a mystery what island is it rainsford asked. You get: Short Story Sketch Note Templates,13 Constructed Response Prompts, Rock,Paper, Scissors Assessment, Co-operative Learning Activity, Interactive Paper Bag Portfolio, Alternative Summative, 'A Sound of Thunder' Unit, 'The Most Dangerous Game' Unit, 'Thank You Mam' Unit, and 'The Most Dangerous Game' Text Analysis Cards,Short Story. Free The Most Dangerous Game study unit worksheets for teachers to print. Comprehension by chapter, vocabulary challenges, creative reading response activities and projects, tests, and much more! During my student teaching at Charlevoix High School, I taught a 10-12 grade elective speech class. Since the class was small in number, we were able to do a number of different speeches. I taught units on informative speaking, storytelling, future view speeches, demonstration speeches, special occasion speeches, impromptu speeches,.

Unit 4, Day 1

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Warm Up: Journal- What was your favorite story as a child? Describe what the story was, and who first told you the story (or where you first read it)

(Discuss warm-up)

Explicit Instructions: Introduce new vocabulary unit. Students complete first exercise as a class while following along with Ms. Emig’s instruction

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will distribute in-class notebooks to students. These notebooks will be used for in-class notes. Ms. Emig will show students a PowerPoint describing the procedures for the in-class notebook

Guided Practice: Students will write names on notebooks, place them in files according to their names. Ms. Emig will direct them in the organization process

Independent Practice: Ms. Emig will present an “Elements of Short Stories: PowerPoint. Today’s lesson will focus on note-taking for the following elements:

Setting

Characters/Characterization

Plot/ Conflict

Point of View

(Theme, Irony, symbolism, Flashback, and Foreshadowing will be covered the next day in class)

Notes URL: http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/lit-elements/overview/


Closure: Discuss notes

Homework:

  • Complete Chapter 8 Vocab
  • Study for quiz on Friday
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November 12, 2013

Unit 4, Day 2

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Warm Up: Students will read short story about a hazing event on a college campus. Students will respond in their journals to the following question:

What is the main idea of this article? Who were the people involved, and what was the event that happened?

Then, the class will discuss this article together

URL: http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2013/08/new-claims-filed-in-lawsuit-over-fraternity-hazing-death-at-niu/

Explicit Instructions: Students will take out in-class notebooks for note-taking

Guided Practice: Ms. Emig will continue giving notes for the following fiction elements: Theme, Irony, symbolism, Flashback, and Foreshadowing

(Close notebooks, distribute pre-assessments)

Independent Practice: Students will complete “The Lottery” pre-assessment paper

Closure: Discuss results of pre-assessment


Homework:

  • Complete Chapter 8 Vocab
  • Study for quiz on Friday

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November 13, 2013

Unit 4, Day 3

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Warm Up Journal : Can you think of any outdated or old traditions that are still around today? For example, a father is supposed to walk his daughter up the aisle at her wedding. In olden times, this was a sign of the father giving ownership of his daughter to her new husband (“dowry”).

Discuss answers

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will distribute pieces of paper, with the majority of them having red dots and one with a black dot. She will ask students to hang on to the papers until the class is over. Students are NOT to show any one the piece of paper, and they are not to open them.

Guided Practice: Ms. Emig will distribute copies of a plot triangle. She wil model how the plot triangle is completed by asking students to help her complete an example using “The Crucible”

URL: http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/plot-diagram/

Independent Practice: Students will complete plot triangle for “The Lottery”

Closure: Students will review and discuss plot triangle


Homework:

  • Complete Chapter 8 Vocab
  • Study for quiz on Friday

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November 14, 2013

Unit 4, Day 4

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Warm Up Journal: Do you know anything about hunting? What place, people, or images come to your mind when you think of hunting?

Discuss warm-up

(Check vocab books for completion)

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will ask students to take out their short story packets and turn to “The Most Dangerous Game”

Guided Practice: Ms. Emig will explain the author’s background and themes in the story while students take notes in their in-class notebooks.

Ms. Emig will then demonstrate how to create annotations in the margins on the text. Students will need to make at least three annotations while reading the story. Annotations can be able the following topics: character, setting, plot,

Independent Practice: Students will

Closure: Students will begin working on their homework, a plot triangle of “The Most Dangerous Game”


Homework:

  • Study for Chapter 8 Vocab
  • Complete 'Most Dangerous Game' plot triangle
  • Study for quiz on Friday
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November 15, 2013

Unit 4, Day 5

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Warm Up: Students will study vocab and complete a Quizlet review for vocabulary Chapter 8

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will explain the directions for the vocab quiz and will take any questions that the students have

Independent Practice: Students will complete vocabulary quiz

If time allows…

Guided Practice: Ms. Emig and students will continue reading 'The Most Dangerous Game'

Closure: Ms. Emig will explain the “Short Story Fair” and assignment that students will have at the conclusion of the unit (summative assessment)

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Game

November 18, 2013

Unit 4, Day 6

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Warm Up: Students will read over the new vocabulary words for Unit 9, taking notes and drawing picture reminders as needed

Guided Practice: Complete Vocabulary Chapter 9 “Ten Words in Context” as a class. Teacher will encourage students to draw pictures/write reminders for each word as needed

Guided Practice: Students then will then take out ‘The Most Dangerous Game.” First, students will read pages 5-10 independently. Students may use headphones while reading. Then, students and Ms. Emig will finish reading the story by alternating reading roles using a “random student selector” tool online. Ms. Emig will point out examples of foreshadowing as they read

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will ensure that students understand the directions for the “Most Dangerous Game Foreshadowing Finder” worksheet.

Independent Practice: Students will revisit the text to look for examples of foreshadowing. They will gather quotes on the outline and will construct a thesis sentence. They

Closure: Questions about foreshadowing worksheet

Return all notebooks and papers to portfolio


Homework:

Foreshadowing worksheet due by 11/19

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November 19, 2013

Unit 4, Day 7

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Warm-Up: Students will respond to the following question in their journals:

What is the scariest story you have ever heard (or the scariest TV show) you’ve ever seen? What made it so terrifying?

Discuss

Guided Practice: Complete Vocabulary Chapter 9 “Matching” as a class. Teacher will encourage students to draw pictures/write reminders for each word as needed

Independent Practice: Ms. Emig will present an Edgar Allan Poe slideshow so the students can learn about the author’s life and work. Students will copy these notes in their in-class notebook

(Show “Poe Boy” and “Edgar Allan Poe” cartoons)

Explicit Instruction: Ms. Emig will distribute “Poe Vocabulary” worksheets. Students will define the following words, which will be seen in Poe’s work:

  • Audacity
  • Phantasm
  • Vexed
  • Dissimulation
  • Intemperance

Students may use their cell phone dictionaries or a traditional dictionary to search for these words.

Guided Practice: Students will then listen to Vincent Price’s reading of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart”

Closure/Homework: Students will be asked to locate a murder mystery story or current event and complete a compare/contrast Venn Diagram (due Friday). Students will have laptops available on Tuesday to locate articles as needed.

Homework

Complete all of Chapter 9 by 11/21

Most dangerous game unitms. schrader

Study for Vocab Chap. 9 on 11/22

Murder Venn Diagram due 11/26

*Students will be reminded to bring in their headphones for class tomorrow*

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November 20, 2013

Unit 4, Day 8

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Warm Up: Students will watch the following video as a pre-reading warm-up. Students will discuss the video and make predictions about the story

“Finding Stories in Ordinary Places” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhmc5_WxdTo

Guided Practice: Students will each sign-out a laptop and log on to the following website to listen to Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Black Cat.” Students will listen to and read the story at their own pace. After each section of reading, students will choose a picture to represent each section. Students will be able to scroll over vocabulary words to check the word’s definition.

(NOTE: This reading activity will be broken up into two days)

Independent Practice: After students have had time to listen to sections of “The Black Cat,” they will write a journal closure entry to summarize what they have read so far.

Closure: When students have completed the activity, they will search for a murder mystery article

Homework

Complete all of Chapter 9 by 11/21

Study for Vocab Chap. 9 on 11/22

Murder Venn Diagram due 11/26

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November 21, 2013

Unit 4, Day 9

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents
Instructional Plan

Warm Up: Students will complete “Sentence Check 1”

Review as a class

Ms. Emig will check for Chapter 9 completed vocab

Guided Practice: Students will each sign-out a laptop and log on to the following website to listen to Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Black Cat.” Students will listen to and read the story at their own pace. After each section of reading, students will choose a picture to represent each section. Students will be able to scroll over vocabulary words to check the word’s definition.

(NOTE: This reading activity will be broken up into two days)

Independent Practice: After students have had time to listen to sections of “The Black Cat,” they will write a journal closure entry to summarize what they have read so far.

If time allows…

Students will have time to look up murder mystery articles for their Poe Venn Diagram Assignment

Homework

Study for Vocab Chap. 9 on 11/22

Murder Venn Diagram due 11/26

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November 22, 2013

Unit 4, Day 10

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Warm Up: Students will have time to study or their vocabulary quiz. They may use their book, their notecards, or the Quizlet app

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will explain each section of the vocabulary test

Most Dangerous Game Units. Schrader's Teaching Portfolio Strategies

Independent Practice: Students will complete the Chapter 9 vocabulary tests

If time allows…

When students finish the test, Ms. Emig will provide them with an “elements of short story” project. Students will be permitted to choose an element of fiction and will create a small poster to define and illustrate the term they choose. These will be due on Wednesday, November 27th

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11/25/13

Unit 4, Day 11

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Warm Up: Ms. Emig will ask students to report the status of their progress on the Poe Venn Diagram assignment. If students need time to complete the project, they can work on the diagram before beginning the author research project.

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will explain the procedures for researching in the media center. Students are to remain respectful of all individuals in the media center, and are to stay on task.

Guided Practice: Students will research their short story authors and take notes on their lives. Ms. Emig will help students determine important information

Independent Practice: Students will choose and author/short story to research.

Closure: Ms. Emig will ask students to share the status of their progress.

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11/26/13

Portfolio

Unit 4, Day 12

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Most Dangerous Game Units. Schrader's Teaching Portfolio Assessment

(Poe Venn Diagram due)

Warm Up: Ms. Emig will ask students to gather all materials needed for continuing their research in the Media Center.

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will explain the procedures for researching in the media center. Students are to remain respectful of all individuals in the media center, and are to stay on task.

Guided Practice: Students will research their short story authors and take notes on their lives. Ms. Emig will help students determine important information and take notes

Independent Practice: Students will continue working on research projects and will begin drafts for the project

Closure: Ms. Emig will ask students to share the status of their progress.

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Unit 4, Day 13

11/27/13

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Most Dangerous Game Unitms. Schrader's Teaching Portfolios

Instructional Plan

Warm Up: Journal- What do you think Edgar Allan Poe’s daily life was like? Did he live in a normal way? Explain your answer.

Explicit Instruction: Ms. Emig will introduce students to the Edgar Allan Poe biography video

Guided Practice: Ms. Emig will introduce students to the questions on the video note sheets

Independent Practice: Students will complete the video notes sheet while watching the Edgar Allan Poe biography film

Most Dangerous Game Unitms. Schrader

Closure: Collect video note sheets

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12/02/13

Unit 4, Day 14

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Warm Up: Have you ever heard of the Legend of Sleepy Hollow? If not, what do you think it is?

Discuss Warm-up

Guided Practice: Students and teacher will complete the introduction to Chapter 10 vocabulary unit

Show student Quizlet flashcards, remind them to review for Unit Test (Chapter 6-10) next Friday

Most Dangerous Game Units. Schrader's Teaching Portfolio Set

Guided Practice: Students will take notes on the life and work of Washington Irving and the impact of his story, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”, upon modern culture

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will explain the Literature Circle Group Roles packet and the individual responsibilities of each role

Source: http://www.gcisd-k12.org/cms/lib/TX01000829/Centricity/Domain/61/Literature_Circles.pdf

Independent Practice: Students will be placed into their assigned groups and will need to determine which group member will have each role.

Closure: Students will share which roles they chose for their individual group members and why they chose the roles

Homework

Study for Ch. 10 vocab on 12/6

Vocab Ch. 10 due on 12/5

Bring in materials for poster on 12/5 and 12/6

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12/03/13

Unit 4, Day 15

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Warm Up: Can you think of any other legends, stories, or actual events that are similar to “Sleepy Hollow?”

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will instruct all students to take out their Literature Circle papers. Papers will be graded per appropriate amount of progress

Guided Practice: Ms. Emig will ask students to come up to the board and fill in what has happened in the story so far on the plot triangle (triangle will be projected onto the board, and students will use markers to fill in information)

Independent Practice: Students will be placed into their assigned groups and will need to determine which group member will have each role.

Closure: Students will be asked to summarize the events of the story so far

Homework

Study for Ch. 10 vocab on 12/6

Vocab Ch. 10 due on 12/5

Bring in materials for poster on 12/5 and 12/6

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12/04/13

Unit 4, Day 16

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Most Dangerous Game Units. Schrader's Teaching Portfolio Lesson

Warm Up: Complete Vocabulary exercises

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will instruct all students to take out their Literature Circle papers. Papers will be graded per appropriate amount of progress

Most Dangerous Game Unitms. Schrader's Teaching Portfolio Allocation

Guided Practice: Ms. Emig will ask students to come up to the board and fill in what has happened in the story so far on the plot triangle (triangle will be projected onto the board, and students will use markers to fill in information)

Independent Practice: Students will be placed into their assigned groups and will need to determine which group member will have each role.

Closure: Students will be asked to summarize the events of the story so far

Homework

Study for Ch. 10 vocab on 12/6

Vocab Ch. 10 due on 12/5

Bring in materials for poster on 12/5 and 12/6

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12/05/13

Unit 4, Day 17

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Warm Up: Turn in Literature Circle group worksheets

Take out vocabulary books to be checked and graded by Ms. Emig

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will explain the directions for the open note quiz

Independent Practice: Students will complete the “Sleepy Hollow” open note quiz and turn it into the folder on Ms. Emig’s desk when complete

Independent Practice: Once students have completed their open notebook quizzes, they will have the opportunity to work on their Author Study projects using the laptops provided

Closure: Students will record on a piece of paper the progress of their project. Ms. Emig will collect these and use them as a reference

Homework

Study for Ch. 10 vocab on 12/6

Bring in materials for poster on 12/5 and 12/6

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

12/06/13

Most Dangerous Game Units. Schrader's Teaching Portfolio Allocation

Unit 4, Day 18

Objectives

  • Identify elements of fiction and components of short stories
  • Cite connections between short story themes and modern events
  • Practice personal organization and critical thinking by keeping organized notes and important documents

Instructional Plan

Warm Up: Students will have time to study vocabulary using their books, handmade flashcards, or online Quizlet flashcards

Explicit Instructions: Ms. Emig will explain the directions for the vocabulary quiz and will answer any questions from the students

Independent Practice: Students will complete the Chapter 10 vocabulary quiz and turn it into the folder on Ms. Emig’s desk when complete.

Independent Practice: Once students have completed their open notebook quizzes, they will have the opportunity to work on their Author Study projects using the laptops provided

Closure: Students will complete a “Short Story Project Checklist” which Ms. Emig can use to understand what students need to complete

Homework

Work on Author Study Short Story Projects

The conflict of good and evil presents itself in “The Most Dangerous Game” and “The Child by Tiger” in two completely different ways. One story being commercial fiction and the other being literary fiction, there are many ways of viewing variables such as good versus evil, realistic versus unrealistic stories and moral significance. The stories have different voices and are meant for different audiences, but in viewing the overall moral importance of both fictional works, the story with a greater moral significance is “The Child by Tiger”. The plot in “The Most Dangerous Game” is simple, obvious and unrealistic. There is a “good guy” trying to escape from the “bad guy” who lives on Ship-Trap Island. Rainsford clumsily tumbles off of…show more content…
In “The Most Dangerous Game” the characterization is set up into stereotypes: the villain, Zaroff, and the hero, Rainsford. Zaroff is considered evil because he likes to hunt, preferably animals with reason (people, in other words), and he has a man servant, Ivan, who happens to be a deaf-mute. Rainsford is the good guy in the story. He doesn’t believe in manslaughter but instead justice and decency. These two characters alone make up the characterization simply because one is good and one is evil, neither of them is considered both good and evil, as opposed to Dick in “The Child by Tiger”. Dick is the only source of characterization, but he is enough. Dick is complex, containing the characteristics of both a hero and villain. Other characters in the story are flat and are there to portray Dick through the eyes of the others. In the beginning of the story Dick is portrayed as a respectable, intelligent person. Wolfe shows through Dick’s transformation into a “bad guy” that any good person can turn evil given any setting. The setting in “The Most Dangerous Game” isn’t sensible to the reader’s eye. On a secluded, uncharted island, there is a castle with electricity. Zaroff imports animals and food periodically, and he happens to also have a big friend, Ivan, with him. The setting in “The Child by Tiger”, however, is set in a real time period in an actual place. At a time of segregation in the southern United States, Dick, a black man, is in an