Unit 2mr. Mac's Class Website

Welcome to the 2014-2015 school year at NOHS! This website is for my students and their parents. You will find lots of great information as well as assignments, due dates for assessments and projects and great resources to help you understand confusing topics in science! The official website for the MacDill Air Force Base.

Courses

The goal of this course is for students to begin to develop a critical understanding of the role of popular movies and television in their own lives and in U.S. culture. The course looks at issues of the relationship of media to social violence, gender identities, sexual identities, adolescents, minority cultures, and the role of the U.S. media globally. It also considers some of the major media genres that characterize U.S. popular television and movies.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts
Cultural Studies - Western

Introduces students to core issues in communication, ranging from the role of language in human history to political questions posed by electronic and digital technologies. Exploring key contemporary problems through timely readings, students learn and write about how the media affect everyday life.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition

Same as ENGL 104. See ENGL 104.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts

Same as ENGL 117. See ENGL 117.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts

Smartphone Cinema will give students an introduction to the basic components, strategies, methodology, vocabulary and techniques used to create short films and other media in a professional way using their own smartphones. Classwork will include viewing and discussion examples as well as practical instruction in video production from initial script through shooting and editing. Students will learn through practical exercises and will produce their own audiovisual projects. Lab work will consist of theoretical and practical case discussions, through a total of five different filming exercises. Students will work in groups of 2 to 5 people depending on the exercise, and they will complete those five projects outside of class time. In addition, class sessions will include training sessions in the lab, learning smart phone camera operation, and digital editing. Credit is not given for MACS 140 if credit for MACS 199: Smartphone Cinema has already been given.

An introduction to aesthetic, conceptual, and technical skills needed to create audiovisual media for digital distribution. Students will learn to communicate and creatively express themselves through new and emerging technologies while becoming more critical digital media consumers and producers. No prior media production experience or equipment is necessary to enroll. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule.

Develops critical media production skills to assess the importance of new media in contemporary culture. The course emphasizes both social and technical aspects of media. As part of the course, students prepare their own media and evaluate current media literacy projects.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours in separate semesters if topics vary.

Same as INFO 202 and IS 202. See IS 202.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

Provides a critical context for recent international cinema by exploring several kinds of genres, aesthetics, and technologies. We will discuss transnational trends in cinema relating to the influence of other media such as gaming, social networking, and personal electronics, as well as consider impacts of economic structures of global filmmaking production and exhibition. We will view popular and art movies, and query longstanding categories such as the teen pic, 'woman's' film, and documentary.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts

Same as ENGL 277 and GWS 204. See GWS 204.

This course introduces students to one of the fastest growing areas in media today: the documentary. It's designed for students who want to expand their knowledge and appreciation of documentaries in all their forms. Using weekly in-class screenings, discussion, readings, ad writing, students will examine a wide variety of documentaries, looking at their styles, purposes, and storytelling 'voices', as well as learning the language and other fundamentals of documentary. We will also cover some of the basic methods involved in planning and creating a documentary. Please note: this is NOT a hands-on production course. Prerequisite: Sophmore standing or above required.

Same as CWL 207. See CWL 207.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts
Cultural Studies - Non-West

Examination of the history, theory, and aesthetics of African-American filmmaking from the silent era to the present. Films are analyzed within their sociocultural contexts, with particular attention to how constructions of race, identity, and community interact with class, gender, and sexuality; and the link between film and other forms of Black expressive culture. The impact of African-American film on popular culture, links to the African Diaspora, and relations with other communities of color will also be discussed. Same as AFRO 211.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - US Minority

This course is designed for students who are curious about (a) how new technologies are changing sportsmedia cultures, and (b) the kinds of knowledges and skills needed to effectively engage with this powerful cultural and economic industry. We'll use four primary focal points (ESPN, Sport Fandom, Action-Sports, Data Production / Smart Stadiums) to help us understand today's sportsmedia cultural industry's challenges and possibilities, and the kinds of challenges and possibilities that the sportsmedia cultural industry creates for society. We'll also use our course focal points and related industry websites to concretize the key concepts (drawn from theoretical readings and applied studies in media studies, sociology, sport studies, and technology studies).

Same as AFRO 227. See AFRO 227.

Same as LLS 250. See LLS 250.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts
Cultural Studies - US Minority

This course serves as an introduction to the many phases of narrative film production. Students will explore—through technical application—the formal qualities of motion pictures and the ways that film communicates space and time, stories, and experiences. Through lectures and labs, students will learn the technical skills and concepts that will enable them to complete a number of production projects outside of class. They will also gain a fundamental grounding in all of the essential skills of the film production workflow. This course is a prerequisite for all upper-level MACS cinema production courses. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Prerequisite: MACS 140 OR MACS 150 OR sophomore standing. Sophomore standing required unless credit has been given for MACS 140 or MACS 150.

Survey of world cinema considered from stylistic, cultural, institutional, and technological perspectives. Covers the history of film from its origins through the 1940s. Lectures, discussions, and screenings of selected films.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts

Survey of world cinema considered from stylistic, cultural, institutional, and technological perspectives. Covers the history of film from the 1940s to the present day. Lectures, discussions, and screenings of selected films.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts

An introduction to the political economy of the media in the U.S. The purpose of the class is to acquaint students with a core understanding of how the media system operates, and with what effects, in a capitalist society. The course examines the role of advertising, public relations, corporate concentration, and government regulation upon journalism, entertainment, culture, and participatory democracy. The class also examines issues such as the Internet, globalization, and public broadcasting.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil
Cultural Studies - Western

Innovation Illinois introduces the histories of UIUC interdisciplinary innovations that brought together students and researchers in engineering, humanities, sciences and the arts. We will explore how local histories of Illinois innovations help us understand today’s innovation trends and processes, from the growth of new design centers on university campuses to contemporary accessibility design, online education, and electronic music. As part of a final research project, students will be introduced to the basics of video editing and will team produce a short-form video using various primary sources. Same as CS 265 and IS 265.

Unit 2mr. mac

Same as IS 266. See IS 266.

Same as ENGL 273. See ENGL 273.

Same as AIS 275 and ENGL 275. See AIS 275.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts
Cultural Studies - US Minority

MACS 282 offers a deep dive into the phenomenon of the Horror Movie. Through the semester we will explore the enduring fascination with the act of scaring one’s self in public. Our class’ first section will discuss tendencies within the narrative itself, the frequent stylistic flourishes deployed by its storytellers and the subtexts these experiences inevitably articulate. The next section will visit a few of the many discourses addressed by the Horror Movie while noting some of the reoccurring themes and motifs that emerge and intersect across the films we will screen. Finally, the Semester will close with a consideration of the Horror Spectacle: the tactics these pictures utilize to keep audiences in seats and eyes on the screen. Through the coming weeks we will discuss the social, political and cultural implications of the Horror Movie’s expressions of gender, sexuality, race, religion, science, and philosophy.

Unit 2mr. Mac's Class Website -

This course examines the technological, stylistic, industrial, and cultural history of animated media from the late 19th century to the present day. Topics covered include animation in the silent era, Disney and Warner Bros., Japanese anime, television animation, abstract animation, cartoons and race, computer-generated animation, GIFs, and motion capture. Weekly required screenings. Using source footage and voiceover narration, students will create several video essays that offer an original analysis of animated works in a historical context.

Introduction to the study of special topics in media and cinema studies, including cultural, social, historical, economic, and/or political issues in media and/or cinema. Topics vary but may include: genres, stars, historical movements, thematic studies, television, convergence culture, new media. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. May be repeated in the same or separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary.

Same as HIST 300. See HIST 300.

Unit 2mr. mac

Presents the nature and development of communication systems; history of communication media; history of journalism, advertising, and broadcasting; and communications in the modern world.

Examines the critical literature on mass media entertainment; reviews significant contemporary issues and develops perspectives for understanding popular culture.

Introduces students to key issues of, major theoretical approaches to, and current debates about the cultural function of films. Course addresses theories of spectatorship, the politics of pleasure, the culture of entertainment, and the cinematic construction of race, class, and gender.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Western

Same as CMN 325 and PS 312. See PS 312.

Provides analytical framework for pursuing film/media production. Emphasizes critical analysis of various aspects of production: e.g., scriptwriting, storyboarding, cinematography, editing, set and costume design, location and studio shooting, sound. Covers theories of representation, narrative, meaning-making, experimentation, and audience in relation to film/media production practices. Does not, however, teach students how to do film and media production (e.g., how to work a camera, etc.). Therefore, students must come to the course with experience in film and/or media production (can be self-taught). Both individual and group projects are encouraged. Students should expect to work as crew for other students in class. Culminates in a public screening at which students present an analysis of their own project--both the process and the finished product. To apply for course, students (individually or in groups) must propose an idea or concept for a film/media project they would like to produce during the class. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours. May be repeated by students who wish to pursue a longer project in two consecutive semesters (may include summer). Students may not repeat the course to pursue separate projects. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Digital media is an immensely pervasive and powerful form of communication that despite its rapid growth has yet to reach most of the world's population. This lecture-based survey course for undergraduates traces the history and formation of personal computing and the Internet, the development of virtual communities and virtual worlds, evolving forms of digital representation and communication, digital visual cultures, features of new media industries, and the rise of participatory media. Evaluation and assessment is based on written exams, quizzes, class discussion in section, and practice-based assignments using new media technologies such as wikis, blogs, games, and digital video. Emphasis is on mastering key concepts of digital media through theory and history, and on critical discussion of distinctive features of digital media objects. Lectures and discussion sections are held in computer-equipped classrooms. Same as INFO 326.

Unit 2mr. mac

Studies the philosophical bases of the functions and the responsibilities of mass communications.

Same as GWS 335. See GWS 335.

Same as GWS 345, INFO 345, and SOC 345. See GWS 345.

Same as KIN 346 and RST 346. See KIN 346.

Explores media structures in relation to cultural content and social functions; examines problems of life and society as treated in mass-produced communications.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

Same as PSYC 352. See PSYC 352.

Examines the notion that the mass media influence our development as gendered individuals, looking at those who argue for and against this notion. Considers different forms of feminist theory applied to the study of mass media, the history and scholarly criticisms of the media and their portrayal of women, and feminist attempts to create alternatives to mainstream media images. Throughout, the course considers representation of minorities in the dominant media and examines newly created alternative representations. Same as GWS 356.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Western

Study of major aesthetic and critical theories about film; study of theory and practice of film criticism.

Addresses the business, industry, and economic implications of the interaction of Internet, television, radio, film, and print outlets through digitization-driven platform and interactive technologies. Explores historical and emergent business models, ownership and work patterns, and investment arrangement related to media convergence. Investigates novel forms of individual and collective labor structures and globally distributed modes of production and consumption. Includes attention to economic and scholarly models seeking to analyze media business structures. Specific topics vary by semester, but may include Google, Disney, and Hollywood studio system, or activist media organizations. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary.

Same as AAS 365. See AAS 365.

This course will teach students advanced principles of sync-sound moving image production, including cinematography, lighting, sound recording, and production logistics. With an emphasis on dramatic visual storytelling, students will produce five scenes from existing scripts, rotating the production roles of director of photography, assistant camera, gaffer, mixer, and boom operator for each script. Directing, editing, and color grading will be covered, and students will be responsible for casting, location scouting, and set-building in order to successfully produce each scene. Students will leave the course knowing the interworking of a film crew, the operation of digital cinema technologies, and advanced visual and aural aesthetics and techniques for narrative filmmaking. This course is a prerequisite for MACS 480/481, the department's capstone seminar in advanced cinema production. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Prerequisite: MACS 260: Film Production.

Students in this course focus on the theory and practice of video editing and post-production. Through weekly assignments and four larger projects, they gain a thorough understanding of narrative editing techniques, color correction, audio post-production and the requisite software. The class covers the art of post-production and how post-production affects narrative function in moving picture media (concentrating on cinema, but looking as well at music videos and television). Assignments include editing a short film, color correction, and sound editing/mixing, among others. Strongly suggested for students who wish to be considered for the editing and postproduction positions in MACS 480/481. Requires MACS 260 as prerequisite. Credit is not be given for MACS 371 if credit for MACS 323: Video and Audio Postproduction has been given. Prerequisite: MACS 260: Film Production.

This course examines the practice of writing for the screen. Students will better understand the fundamentals of visual storytelling and learn standard formats of screenwriting. In a classroom environment that combines lecture, screening, film analysis, and workshop discussion of students' work, the student will be exposed to a wide variety of concepts related to the preparation and writing of the screenplay. Special emphasis will be given to the ideas of plot structure and character development, the two pillars on which the screenplay is built. This intensive scriptwriting class is intended to 1.) help students create a variety of writing tools and short scenes that will serve as the building blocks for 2.) constructing, writing and revising a short narrative screenplay. Issues of industry professionalization with regard to screenwriting will also be covered. Prerequisite: MACS 260: Film Production.

Same as ENGL 373. See ENGL 373.

Examines the portrayal and participation of Latinas and Latinos in the U.S. media using a variety of interdisciplinary approaches. Addresses historical and political movements that have been critical to Latina/Latino print, broadcast, and electronic communication within the broader context of cultural diversity. Same as LLS 375.

Introduces students to the multiple dimensions of cross-national and comparative communications. Specific topics will vary according to instructor's focus, but may include human dimensions of global communication, intercultural communication, media impact, structure and processes of institutional communication (i.e. propaganda, diplomacy).

Unit 2mr. mac

Documentary has exploded in the past decade, with more being created, screened and watched than at any time in history. But what has this growth meant to documentary, and how has it impacted what we see on screen and how documentary stories are being told? We will examine the changes and trends taking place in film and television documentaries over the past decade. We will watch and analyze a variety of contemporary documentaries, examining some of the different stylistic, production, and story-telling methods that have developed over this time. If you enjoy watching documentaries and want to learn more about them, you will find this an enjoyable and thought-provoking course.

Same as AFRO 381. See AFRO 381.

Same as CWL 387 and FR 387. See FR 387.

Same as CWL 389 and FR 389. See FR 389.

Provides an interdisciplinary approach to international communications; its structure and content; the role of international communications in conflict and conflict resolution; the semantics of international communication; the technical and economic aspects of international mass communications; and government-industry relations in communications. Same as PS 389.

Individual research and exploration of media and cinema studies topics under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated in the same or in multiple semesters, if topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Cultural, social, historical, economic, and/or political issues in media and/or cinema; topics vary but may include: genres, historical movements, thematic studies, television, convergence culture, new media. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary.

Examines factors reshaping TV and its relationship to culture, including genres, industry practices (advertising, production, distribution), new media technologies (YouTube, Twitter, and newer developments), and computer gaming. Analyzes places/spaces of television, mobility, surveillance, television as instruction/guide (dating, cooking, fashion), citizenship, consumption, and TV in everyday life. Focuses on contemporary aspects of TV, with some attention to earlier forms and practices of television. Students required to view and analyze some television programs outside of class. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

Surveys the major ethical problems in news, advertising, publications and entertainment media; includes case studies and moral reasoning on confidentiality, privacy, conflicts of interest, deception, violence, and pornography. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

Same as SLAV 419. See SLAV 419.

Unit 2mr. Mac's Class Website Login

Same as LING 423 and PSYC 423. See PSYC 423.

Same as LING 425. See LING 425.

Same as AAS 435, AFRO 435, GWS 435, and LLS 435. See LLS 435.

Same as AIS 461. See AIS 461.

Examines the history and significance of film festivals: What they mean for the film industry (marketing, distribution, production), audiences (both at the festival and beyond), film history, and the evolution of filmmaking. Covers specific local, national, and international festivals including festivals focused on particular issues (e.g., Chicago International Children's Film Festival, San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival, Miami Gay and Lesbian Film Festival, and our own local IUB 48-Hour Film Contest). Coordinated with Roger Ebert's Film Festival (which is held in Champaign every April) including internship/volunteer opportunities, screenings, and meetings with guests. Class culminates with a UIUC student film festival, organized, judged, and sponsored by the class. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

Examines the influence of Japan's traditional aesthetics on its cinema and surveys its major film movements, genres, and directors. Same as CWL 467 and EALC 466. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One course in the College of Media or East Asian Languages and Cultures, or consent of instructor.

Same as ITAL 470. See ITAL 470.

This is an intensive pre-professional course in cinema production. It is designed to provide advanced film production students with a workshop opportunity to refine their skills by making a 30-minute narrative film over the course of the semester. The main focus of the class will involve the cinematic treatment of a selected screenplay—from script to final edited stage. The philosophy of the class is learning by doing. Students will be instructed in the finer points of professional film production, including casting, rehearsal, scheduling, blocking, assembly, rushes, and other aspects of the workflow of fiction filmmaking. There will be a division of labor on each project. The class will be divided into two crews consisting of assigned positions. These positions are assigned by the instructor based on a student's previous performance in MACS production courses (particularly MACS 370). The positions are: Producer (production manager/assistant director, location scout), Director, Production Designer (promotion and graphics, unit still photographer; script supervisor), Director of Photography (assistant sound mixer), Assistant Camera (colorist), Gaffer (assistant colorist), Sound Designer (recordist/mixer), and Editor (production designer’s assistant; boom operator). Each group will collectively choose a short film to produce from a series of selected scripts. The semester will culminate in a public screening of the class projects of both groups. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Prerequisite: MACS 370: Cinematography and Sound Recording. Concurrent enrollment in MACS 481: Advanced Filmmaking Studio is required. Junior or Senior standing recommended for this course.

This is an intensive pre-professional course in cinema production. It is designed to provide advanced film production students with a workshop opportunity to refine their skills by making a 30-minute narrative film over the course of the semester. The main focus of the class will involve the cinematic treatment of a selected screenplay—from script to final edited stage. The philosophy of the class is learning by doing. Students will be instructed in the finer points of professional film production, including casting, rehearsal, scheduling, blocking, assembly, rushes, and other aspects of the workflow of fiction filmmaking. There will be a division of labor on each project. The class will be divided into two crews consisting of assigned positions. These positions are assigned by the instructor based on a student's previous performance in MACS production courses (particularly MACS 370). The positions are: Producer (production manager/assistant director, location scout), Director, Production Designer (promotion and graphics, unit still photographer; script supervisor), Director of Photography (assistant sound mixer), Assistant Camera (colorist), Gaffer (assistant colorist), Sound Designer (recordist/mixer), and Editor (production designer’s assistant; boom operator). Each group will collectively choose a short film to produce from a series of selected scripts. The semester will culminate in a public screening of the class projects of both groups. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Prerequisite: MACS 370: Cinematography and Sound Recording. Concurrent enrollment in MACS 480: Advanced Filmmaking Studio is required. Junior or Senior standing recommended for this course.

This course examines the theory and practice of videographic criticism, a burgeoning scholarly practice in media and cinema studies, in a workshop-style environment. Through weekly parameter-based videographic exercises using pre-existing media of their choice, students will learn how to conduct videographic research by critically exploring media texts using non-linear editing software (Adobe Premiere Pro). A diverse variety of explanatory, algorithmic, and poetic approaches to the video essay will be covered. Assignments will include several videographic projects as well as a final synoptic video essay. An intellectual curiosity for the videographic medium is crucial, but no prior experience in media production or non-linear editing is required. Students will be responsible for storing and backing up their data, but all coursework will be conducted using University equipment and software. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Credit is not given for MACS 485 if credit for MACS 496: Making Video Essays has been given. Prerequisite: Junior standing required.

Same as EURO 489 and SCAN 490. See SCAN 490.

Same as SCAN 492. See SCAN 492.

Same as GER 493. See GER 493.

Same as GER 494. See GER 494.

Seminar based on internship experience. Offered for College of Media students who complete an approved internship. 0 to 1 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in the same term to a maximum of 2 undergraduate hours. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 3 undergraduate hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Advanced study of cultural, social, historical, economic, and/or political issues in media and/or cinema; topics vary but may include national and transnational cinemas, directors, genres, historical movements, social and political movements, thematic studies, television, convergence culture, new media and media production. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 undergraduate hours or 8 graduate hours, if topics vary. Prerequisite: One College of Media course or consent of instructor.

Required of Media and Cinema Studies majors, a senior project (0 credits) to be completed in conjunction with a 300- or 400-level MACS course taken in their senior year. 0 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Approved for S/U grading only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and a completed/submitted MACS Senior Project Learning Agreement. Restricted to Senior Media and Cinema Studies majors.

Seminar on historical perspectives on cinema as an institution, a body of signifying practices, a product to be consumed, a phenomenon of modernity, and a cultural artifact, and on cinema in relation to other screen media. Same as CWL 503 and ENGL 503.

Seminar on influential theories and accompanying debates about the textual/extra-textual mechanisms and cultural/political impact of cinema and related screen media. Same as CWL 504 and ENGL 504.

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